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31Dec

Songwriter Kendall Hayes was born in Perryville, KY on October 6, 1935.  His most notable song was “Walk On By” that LeRoy Van Dyke made popular, then it was recorded by more than 150 artists – memorable to most by Dionne Warwick.  read more on that here

here is his obituary that ran in the New York Times:

Kendall L. Hayes; Songwriter, 59

Published: February 15, 1995

DANVILLE, Ky., Feb. 14— Kendall L. Hayes, a country-music songwriter whose song “Walk On By” was recorded by 150 artists, died on Friday at his home here in Danville, Kentucky. He was 59.

The cause was liver cancer, his family said.

Mr. Hayes, whose other big hit was “Don’t Give Up the Ship,” recorded by Johnny Wright, also performed in Grand Ole Opry roadshows in the 1960’s.

In 1961, Leroy Van Dyke’s version of “Walk On By” was No. 1 on Billboard magazine’s country singles chart for 19 weeks, and reached No. 5 on the pop chart.

Billboard named the Van Dyke recording the top-charting country record of all time in its 100th-anniversary edition, published in November. “Walk On By” was also recorded by Asleep at the Wheel, Donna Fargo and the rockabilly artist Robert Gordon.

He is survived by his wife, Doris, of Danville; two sons, James, of Lexington, Ky., and Michael, of Fort Worth, and a brother, Harman, of St. Louis.


31Dec

The latitude of Perryville is 37.650N. The longitude is -84.951W.

It is in the Eastern Standard time zone. Elevation is 840 feet.

Now you know!   :-)

Also, a good place to find us is in the center of the state, about 8 miles west of Danville, Kentucky and 35 miles south of Lexington, KY – one of Kentucky’s favorite cities.


29Dec

PERRYVILLE, Ky. – Perryville Battlefield State Historic Site is planning its annual Civil War battle re-enactment with a special emphasis on horses for 2010.

That’s because the Oct. 2-3 re-enactment weekend occurs during the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. The Games are the world’s most prestigious equestrian event and will attract guests from around the world Sept. 25-Oct. 10, 2010.

The theme for the Perryville re-enactment will be “Horse Soldiers – Cavalry in the American Civil War.” There will be expert Read more…


28Dec

History :

During the final stages of the American Revolution, James Harbeson and a group of settlers crossed the blue mountains of Virginia and found their way into the Bluegrass region of Kentucky. Finding a suitable site alongside the Chaplin River, the settlers built a fort next to a spring and cave. This fort, dubbed Harbeson’s Station after its founder, was the precursor to modern-day Perryville. The settlers farmed the east bank of the Chaplin River. When troubles with local Indians arose, they would flee across the water and into the cave to seek shelter from attack. The cave, which can still be viewed today, formed the settlers’ first line of defense. One day James Harbeson failed to reach the mouth of the cave in time. Local legend holds that Harbeson disappeared. His head, however, Read more…


26Dec

to read the article, click here.

By BARRY NEWMAN of the WSJ  

LEXINGTON, Ky. — There are two tea-party movements in America. One favors low taxes, small government and patriotic feeling. The other favors fine china, orange pekoe and cordial chitchat.

The two have coexisted uneasily since Dec. 16, 1773, when antitax demonstrators dumped 342 chests of quite drinkable tea into Boston Harbor. Lately, tea dumpers have touched off a raucous revival. But tea sippers, enjoying a genteel revival of their own, aren’t showing the dumpers much sympathy.

“I’m promoting tea parties — just not that kind of tea party,” says Bruce Richardson, who lives in Perryville, a village 45 miles southwest of here. For a living, he imports tea, publishes books about tea and teaches tea-brewing and tea-party proprieties.

Read more…


16Dec

Who led the armies?Perryville, KY Danville, Kentucky Bluegrass farms for salePerryville, KY Danville, Kentucky Bluegrass farms for sale

Major General Don Carlos Buell (from Ohio) led the Union army. General Braxton Bragg (born in North Carolina) led the Confederate army.Who led the armies? Major General Don Carlos Buell (from Ohio) led the Union army. General Braxton Bragg (born in North Carolina) led the Confederate army.


9Dec

We will be making vinyl stick on for your vehicle, your place of business, for your home – or for any reason you like.  These stickersPerryville KY will be available at Worley’s Perryville Furniture Mart and through this site.

Show your support for Historic Perryville and help us spread the word that Perryville, KY is simply the center of the Universe.  :-)


6Dec

Perryville, KY

In 1862, Lytle’s regiment took part in the endless march from Alabama to Kentucky, which led to his second battlefield wounding during the Battle of Perryville. The colonel was left on the field for dead, but did not succumb to his wound. He was taken prisoner and thus managed to miss the Battle of Stones River. He was exchanged on Feb. 4, 1863 and quickly moved to rejoin the army in Murfreesboro.

Click here for the entire article


16Nov

Why was the battle fought at Perryville?
The Confederates stopped here to stay between the Union army and a supply depot they had established at Bryantsville (30 miles E/NE of Perryville). Also, despite a severe drought, small pools of water were available in Perryville’s creeks and rivers, which the soldiers badly needed. The hilly terrain around Perryville also gave the armies good defensive positions.


24Oct

Book review | Exploring the drama of Perryville

Kentucky Land for Sale Civil War Ground

Kentucky’s turn in the Civil War spotlight in 1862 may have been brief, but it was far from uneventful. In the weeks between late August, when Confederate forces invaded from Tennessee, and Oct. 8, when both sides fought to a draw in the fields near Perryville, the outcome of the war and possibly the future of the nation hung in the balance.

Kentucky was a slave state that did not leave the Union and tried to stay neutral. But that was a daunting challenge with Federal troops controlling Kentucky’s rivers and cities, including Louisville, and Confederate armies occupying the Bluegrass from Bardstown to Richmond.

Both sides desperately wanted Kentucky’s……  Click detail to read more……. Read more…