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Posts Tagged ‘Kendall Hayes’



13Jun

The Battle of Perryville
October 8, 1862

Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg’s autumn 1862 invasion of Kentucky had reached the outskirts of Louisville and Cincinnati, but he was forced to retreat and regroup.

On October 7, the Federal army of Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, numbering nearly 55,000, converged on the small crossroads town of Perryville, Kentucky, in three columns. Union forces first skirmished with Rebel cavalry on the Springfield Pike before the fighting became more general, on Peters Hill, as the grayclad infantry arrived. The next day, at dawn, fighting began again around Peters Hill as a Union division advanced up the pike, halting just before the Confederate line. The fighting then stopped for a time. After noon, a Confederate division struck the Union left flank and forced it to fall back. When more Confederate divisions joined the fray, the Union line made a stubborn stand, counterattacked, but finally fell back with some troops routed.

Buell did not know of the happenings on the field, or he would have sent forward some reserves. Even so, the Union troops on the left flank, reinforced by two brigades, stabilized their line, and the Rebel attack sputtered to a halt. Later, a Rebel brigade assaulted the Union division on the Springfield Pike but was repulsed and fell back into Perryville. The Yankees pursued, and skirmishing occurred in the streets in the evening before dark.

Union reinforcements were threatening the Rebel left flank by now. Bragg, short of men and supplies, withdrew during the night, and, after pausing at Harrodsburg, continued the Confederate retrograde by way of Cumberland Gap into East Tennessee. The Confederate offensive was over, and the Union controlled Kentucky.

 



1Jul

Ghost tours start this weekend in historic Perryville
By DAVID BROCK
dbrock@amnews.com
PERRYVILLE — A town with Perryville’s history is bound to have its share of things that go bump in the night. Starting Friday, people can try to get in touch with the spooky side of the little city on the Chaplin River.

Terry Goode is starting Haunted Perryville, a tour that combines history with ghost stories about a town that has plenty of both.

“I have had this in mind for a great while and have really been thinking hard about it for the last two years,” Goode said. “It didn’t seem possible until I just decided to go ahead and do it. I want to give people a lot of Read more…


13Jun

The Civil War Preservation Trust, a nonprofit battlefield preservation organization, has donated 54 acres associated with the October 1862 battle of Perryville to the state of Kentucky for the Perryville Battlefield State Historic Site.

“The gift of this land will provide an enriched experience for Read more…


15Mar

The tea-he’s More men are savouring brew by the cup  March 15, 2010

LINI S. KADABA – THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR, PHILADELPHIA

The 10 men bantered about their wives’ cooking, boxing greats and suits that fit too snugly.

This, however, was no sports bar meet-up or barbershop chat. Two hours earlier, Howard James, a co-proprietor of Tea Country in Philadelphia, had called the group to order by taking requests for a beverage steeped in centuries of Read more…


10Mar

PERRYVILLE, Ky., via BARDSTOWN, Oct. 10, 1862. To Maj-Gen. Hallack, General-in-Chief:

I have already advised you of the movements of the army under my command from Louisville. More or less skirmishing has occurred daily with the enemy’s cavalry. Since then it was supposed the enemy would give battle at Bardstown. My troops reached that point on the 4th inst., driving out the enemy’s rear guard of cavalry and artillery. The main body retired toward Springfield, whither the pursuit was continued.

The centre corps, under Gen. GILBERT, moved on the direct road from Springfield to Perryville, and arrived on the 7th instant within two miles of the town, where the enemy was found to be Read more…


25Jan

Monday, 25 January 2010
by Heidi Kyser

Following four years of research and preparation, husband and wife Danielle and Miller Montague opened MonTea in Lexington, Ky., Nov. 16, 2009. The shop’s tagline is, “Featuring Elmwood Inn Fine Teas,” and it reflects a unique partnership between a retailer and wholesaler.

Both Danielle Montague and Bruce Richardson, owner of Elmwood Inn in nearby Perryville, Ky., described their partnership as a loose one, based on Read more…


25Jan

By HERB BROCK

Boyle County has more than its share of food marts and convenience stores. Like churches, it seems there is one on every corner. And just about all welcome a variety of customers, from locals to travelers.

But every one of these little stores is unique, and Mr. Miser is Perryville certainly fits that description.

There aren’t many of these marts who can say their Read more…


13Jan

You’ve passed by them, often times without thinking – the historical markers that stand by the roads and highways around the US

(and other countries). These document are history with some perspectives that books often fail to provide. To me, a marker helps place the facts within the geographic setting that is often poorly understood within the simple black and white texts in the books. Click Here For Kentucky’s Historic Markers


31Dec

Songwriter Kendall Hayes was born in Perryville, KY on October 6, 1935.  His most notable song was “Walk On By” that LeRoy Van Dyke made popular, then it was recorded by more than 150 artists – memorable to most by Dionne Warwick.  read more on that here

here is his obituary that ran in the New York Times:

Kendall L. Hayes; Songwriter, 59

Published: February 15, 1995

DANVILLE, Ky., Feb. 14— Kendall L. Hayes, a country-music songwriter whose song “Walk On By” was recorded by 150 artists, died on Friday at his home here in Danville, Kentucky. He was 59.

The cause was liver cancer, his family said.

Mr. Hayes, whose other big hit was “Don’t Give Up the Ship,” recorded by Johnny Wright, also performed in Grand Ole Opry roadshows in the 1960′s.

In 1961, Leroy Van Dyke’s version of “Walk On By” was No. 1 on Billboard magazine’s country singles chart for 19 weeks, and reached No. 5 on the pop chart.

Billboard named the Van Dyke recording the top-charting country record of all time in its 100th-anniversary edition, published in November. “Walk On By” was also recorded by Asleep at the Wheel, Donna Fargo and the rockabilly artist Robert Gordon.

He is survived by his wife, Doris, of Danville; two sons, James, of Lexington, Ky., and Michael, of Fort Worth, and a brother, Harman, of St. Louis.